Sleepless Nights Equal Prime Reading Time

by Elizabeth Zahorchak-Chambers
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One of life’s ironies is that the time we have left to bank sleep before life begins with a newborn, our bodies rebel and insomnia sets in. Warm milk, yoga stretches, waking up our partner and trying to convince them it would be more fun to give us a foot rub than to try and sleep, we try it all. When all else fails, it is time to crack open a new book.

 

If you have not started delving into the world of pregnancy books that surround us, here are a few ideas.

 

What to Expect When Expecting: 4th Edition Edited by Arlene Eisenberg

 

You will have a new appreciation for the fruits and vegetables around you as you start comparing the growing baby inside you to different forms of produce. This book is broken down nicely and has an interesting question and answer section that will often cover your common concerns or queries. This is a great start for getting pregnancy information, and has been read by so many it can be easily found at the bookstore, library or used book depot.

 

Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth by Ina May Gaskin

 

This is for all the Moms-to-be that have chosen to go the midwife route. Ina May is a famous midwife from the states who has been pivotal in the development of birthing centers. Her approach to childbirth is wonderfully positive and encouraging. She is realistic and gives you a well rounded picture of both hospital and home births.

 

Baby Center Pregnancy from Preconception to Birth edited by Linda J Murray

 

One of the best parts of this book is that it is connected to one of the greatest resource websites for parents available on-line. Once you register on the website you can get information sent to you weekly from pregnancy to toddler years. The book is well laid out, full of images and again addresses the majority of concerns and areas of interest that you can think of.

 

Pregnancy Day by Day Canadian Edition by Elaine Herer

 

Once you have read all the books and are you still looking for more to read on the baby growing inside you or how you are feeling, it is time to pull out this book. It can be daunting in size, but a fun and enjoyable read.

 

Once you have read all that you can read on your growing banana perhaps it is time to turn to fiction.

 

The Birth House: A Novel by Ami McKay

 

If you decide that you want to keep with the baby theme even though you have gone into the area of fiction, this is a great book to read. This is the story of Dora Rare who is the only daughter in five generations of children. She starts to learn to be a midwife in a small Canadian town and recounts quite the tale of ups and downs.

 

For those of you that are sick of thinking about growing and delivering this child, perhaps fiction that has nothing to do with babies might be in order.

 

In the Field by Claire Tacon

 

“Once, on a tour of his school’s music room, Terrence picked up a violin and played it next to a cello. As he sounded the E string, the A on the cello vibrated because they share an overtone. It’s why people fall in love, he said, because even though one is a violin and the other is a cello they sense their sameness.” 

This engaging story tells the story of Ellie Lucan who is a professor who faces job loss, marriage issues and an aging and ailing parent. She must discover what she truly wants in life while choosing how best to care for her mother, what to do about the temptation of a long lost love and how to deal with the small town prejudice that her biracial face.

 

The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh

 

On her eighteenth birthday, the social worker tells foster child Victoria Jones, “this is it, you know…your life starts here. No one to blame but yourself from here on out.” With that Victoria starts life without anyone to check up on her and no one to answer to. From a childhood experience this young woman has an understanding of the true meaning of each type of flower. She knows that baby’s breath means everlasting love, a daisy means innocence, a gerbera daisy means cheerfulness and rosemary means remembrance. She uses the flowers to build bouquets to help those around her communicate and in the process faces her past, her present and her possible future.

Being a foster parent myself I have to note that the author mentions in the novel that camellias mean my destiny is in your hands and so she has created the Camellia Network to help foster youth transitioning into adulthood. I love when the novels we read can lead to improving the world around us.

 

Chai Tea Sunday by Heather A. Clark

 

“We do not lose the people we love, even to death…(she) has left a mark on your soul and there is no one and nothing that can take that from you.”

This amazing book is one that you should buy and save for after you safely deliver your pride and joy but then when you need a good fictional emotional journey to get all those hormones really pumping through you, it is time to pick up this novel. This is the story of Nicky Fowler who with her husband face a horrible loss. In order to get away from it all Nicky travels to Kenya and through volunteering and helping others there, finds a way to heal herself.

Again I must mention that this book has a higher mission in that a portion of the sales of the book goes to an organization called Artbound which supports Free the Children. 

 

While the ideas for books to read and novels to absorb your mind could go on for ever, we shall end this time with a book that can easily be picked up and put down. This one is perfect for the Mom-to-be who has become the To-do list queen and is welcoming the nesting period of her pregnancy.

 

1000 Best Quick and Easy Organizing Secrets by Jamie Novak

 

This book has been compiled by the founder of ClutterprooofingTM products and is great to tackle in the middle of the night when you just cannot get any shuteye. This has fantastic ideas on how to de-clutter every room in your house and even every area of your life. In reality a true added bonus about pregnancy is the chance to prepare for life as a parent. The more proactive you are at getting organized and de-cluttered, the easier life will become in the long run.

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